Russell County Resources – Tax Records

If you haven’t been using tax records in your research, you could be missing out on a goldmine of information! The microfilmed tax lists are for Kentucky State taxes and the headers changed from year to year based on what the General Assembly had approved for that specific year.

There is an excellent article called “Tax Lists (1792-1840) An Overlooked Resource for Kentucky History & Land Title” written by Kandie Adkinson from the Kentucky Land Office available online which every Kentucky researcher should read and refer to. It will give you great insight into the laws of the times so you’ll know exactly what you could find in the tax records. For example:

  • All free males 21 years of age or older were enumerated on tax lists if they owned one horse. Notice that there was no requirement to own land to be in the tax list, but at least one horse. So if you’re unsure of the date of birth for an early Kentucky ancestor, see if you can find the first year that they appear in a tax list. That could be the year that they turned 21, or close to it.
  • Women were included on tax lists if they were the head-of-the-household. (Unless she had another male in her family pay the taxes.) Finding a female ancestor’s name in a tax list can help you to narrow down a date of death for her spouse. I have read that after a man died, his widow had one year to mourn and then had to start paying the taxes so take that into consideration when looking for an approximate date of death.
  • More often than not, the tax records include the number of school age children within a family. Pay attention to the age ranges as they didn’t stay consistent.
  • Taxpayers were allowed to report land that they owned in other counties or states. Excellent clues to be found there!
  • Sometimes, a person would be declared to be exempt from paying taxes. This would include ministers, veterans, poor, disabled and widows unless she had a male over 16 residing in the home. So if an ancestor disappears from the list, he may not be dead, he may have been exempt. You might find a court record that gives a date that a person was declared exempt from taxes.

Russell County was formed at the end of 1825/beginning of 1826, so available tax records can be found between 1826-1874. That’s half a century of “yearly census” information! The only years that are missing are 1830, 1832 and 1834. The information in each tax list may be slightly different and I’m only going to give specific information that I feel would be most helpful for research.

In the early tax lists, you’ll find information on

  • the amount of land
  • the “rate” of the land (In 1793, it was declared that “The rich lands in Fayette County shall be considered as the standard of first-rate land.” This was repealed one year later, but the land continued to be rated until 1840.)
  • In whose name Entered (who received the warrant – often assigned to someone else and thus the remaining names might be different), Surveyed (might be the same person or it might be the assignee) and Patented (also called the land grant). This information is only available in the first 10 years of tax lists.
  • the county the land was in
  • the nearest water course
  • the number of white males above 21 years old
  • the number of slaves above 16 years old
  • the total number of slaves
  • the number of horses, mules and cattle (Remember, a man had to have a horse to be taxed.)
  • the number of coaches and carriages
  • the number of billiard tables and retail stores

New items were tracked as time passed and by the 1870’s, you’ll also find items such as:

  • the number of town lots
  • the value of gold, silver and other metallic watches and clocks
  • the value of gold and silver plate
  • the value of pianos
  • the number of dogs
  • the number of sheep killed by dogs
  • the number of pounds of tobacco and hemp
  • tons of hay
  • the number of bushels of corn, wheat and barley
  • Income from U.S. Bonds

Beginning in 1840, Russell County was divided into 2 districts – the upper district and the lower district. If you don’t find your ancestor in the 1st section of the tax list, be sure to look in the 2nd section. If a section was labeled as upper or lower, I tried to include that information. It would probably be possible to figure out which link is upper and which is lower based on the first few names listed, but I have not taken the time to do that.

Specific, unique genealogy info included
1826
1827
1828
1829 Children over 4 years old and under 15, No. of children at school
1831
1833
1835
1836
1837 No longer dividing land by “rate”, no longer asking in whose name entered, surveyed, patented
1838 Male children over 5 & under 15, females over 5 & under 15, total, the full label is only on page 1 and the upper number is difficult to read so 15 is my guess.
1839
1840 – pre-printed forms issued. Land is no longer categorized by “rate”.
1840 2 sections Children between 7 & 17 years old
1841 2 sections Children between 7 & 17 years old
1842 2 sections Children between 7 & 17 years old
1843 2 sections Children between 7 & 17 years old
1844 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1845 upper district Children between 5 & 16 years old
1846 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1847 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1848 lower district Children between 5 & 16 years old
1849 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1850 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1851 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1852 2 sections Children between 5 & 16 years old
1853 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1854 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1855 Children between 6 & 18 years old
1856 Children between 6 & 18 years old
1857 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1858 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1859 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1860 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1861 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1862 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1863 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
1864 2 sections Children between 6 & 18 years old
No longer asking for number of slaves
1865 upper district Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1866 lower district Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1867 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1868 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1869 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1870 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1871 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1872 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1873 Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1874 Name of Nearest Resident, No. of Election Precinct in which situated, Enrolled Militia, Children between 6 and 20 years old
1875 not yet available online

 

 

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Not Your Average Christmas Ideas

Every year, when I’m asked to start making a Christmas list, I always Google “Christmas gifts for genealogists” and every year, it gets harder to find items that I don’t already have. Over the years, I’ve accumulated plenty of flash drives, external drives, photography equipment, scanners, genealogy books and shirts. Maybe you’re in the same boat and you’re looking for something that would be useful even though it doesn’t scream “GENEALOGY”! Here are some simple things that I like to use in my research that are a little more “out of the box”.

  1. casePencil case or zippered glasses case – I used to be a high school teacher and occasionally, I’d get a Christmas gift from a student and it would quite often be a small zippered case of some type. You might think this sounds funny, but I know that they are a popular gift here because Ft. Wayne is the home of Vera Bradley and every spring, there is an outlet sale where women go CRAZY getting the patterns and sizes that they want. The zippered cases are some of the smaller ticket price items, so it’s easy to grab several to put away for Christmas. I use these as my “genealogy go-bags”. I have one in my backpack, one by my recliner and one in the glove compartment of my car. I keep a flash drive, chap stick, mechanical pencil, extra lead, a highlighter, paper clips, eraser and small post-it notes in each. (The Genealogy mug is a previous Christmas gift and I included it in the picture to give an idea of size for the zippered case.)
  2. organizerSupply organizer – sometimes, if I travel for a longer period of time of research, I’ll take my “office in a box”. I believe this one was actually a fishing tackle thing, but you can also get something similar at a craft store in the embroidery floss area. In addition to paper clips, pencils, pens and highlighters, I keep a mini stapler, staple remover, flash drive, lighted magnifying glass, post-its in various sizes, a ruler and hand lotion.
  3. Calculator paper rolls (receipt paper rolls) – Calculator_rollsthese can be easily found in the office supply area of Walmart or Target for under $5. I use them for quick timelines, to do lists and for making lists of page numbers to look up. They are so cheap, I don’t feel like I have to worry about scribbling on a sheet and re-creating it over and over if I need to. A nice stocking stuffer idea!
  4. Calculator paper roll holder – Honestly, I keep my rolls in my desk drawer and I pull them out when I need them. But this year, I just might ask for holder to help clear some space in my drawer. If you GoogleCalculator rolls holder “Calculator paper roll holder” and look at the images, you can see all kinds of “make it yourself” ideas from Pinterest. If you or a family member is a DIY kinda person, here are instructions for a simple one I like. If you’re looking for something a little more modern, you can always find something like this on Amazon.
  5. Rolls of blank newsprint – Pretty much a jumbo version of the above. I use this paper to do mind-mapping or to draw out potential family relationships before I commit anything to my software. And while you can buy these rolls online or at an office supply store, my mother went to her local newspaper and told them she was moving and asked if they had any roll ends that she could have and they gave her quite a hefty roll for free! (Better get ’em while we still have printed newspapers!)
  6. Can’t get your hands on rolls of newsprint? Look for a jumbo drawing pad made for a kid’s easel. Something like this from Walmart. 50 sheets of 20 x 17 paper for only $7. You can also find pads of drawing paper at art supply stores, but if the paper isn’t made for kids, it’s probably a bit more money. For example, a pad of 25 sheets of 18 x 24 Strathmore paper is $17 at Hobby Lobby.
  7. pouchesSelf-sealing lamination pouches – these come in various sizes and thicknesses, but I like the ones that will fit an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper. I use them for reference type documents that I use a lot. For example, I have my 5 generation group sheets for my grandmother and my grandfather on both sides of the family. I refer to them all the time when working with my DNA matches. I also have a laminated “Shared cM Project” chart and a list of my most often used citation format templates. I can also write on these with my dry erase markers which is nice when I’m tracking DNA matches! Get these at any office supply store, Amazon or store like Walmart or Target.
  8. Extra large mouse pad – my office setup has 3 monitors: my laptop in the center, a widescreen Smart tv/monitor to my right (so I can also watch Netflix while researching!) and an older monitor on my left that has a stand that allows me to keep it rotated to be taller rather than wider so that I can display documents on that screen while transcribing on my laptop. But having 3 monitors means that my mouse sometimes has to take several “trips” across my traditional mouse pad to get from one side monitor to the other. My current, traditional mouse pad is about 8.5 x 7.5. But my sons enjoy online gaming and they have extra large mouse pads, like this 18.5 x 17.5 one from Amazon. There are gaming mouse pads in all different sizes, so Google it and see what might work best for your set up. These are also available at most electronics stores.
  9. green folders(and 10 and 11!) Decorative file folders – plaid foldersI try to keep my office organized, but it’s not unusual to come in a realize that it looks like a tornado has come through and dumped papers, post-its, photos and negatives all over my desk! Because I work my “real job” from home, it’s often a mix of work and genealogy stuff. I have a bamboo tablet stand from Ikea that I keep file folders on as well as a “Fintorp” hanging system with 2 utensil holders and 1 condiment stand. I use the utensil holders for digital accessory cables, highlighters and dry erase markers and the condiment stand for headphones, cables and file folders. I like to have a different pattern of file folder for each project that I’m working on, so I head to the local office supply store and take photos of the folders that I like and send the photos to my husband.

I hope everyone has a Blessed Christmas Season and a few minutes here and there for family history research!

Christmas Family Tree

A couple of years ago, I bought an tall, skinny Christmas tree on clearance after the holidays. I decided I wanted a “family tree” in my entry way and now it’s one of my favorite things in all of my decorating. I decided to make ornaments out of old black and white family photos. This won’t be a tutorial because there are already tons of those out there, but I wanted to share my tree for those who might be looking for a Christmas project you could work on together with family.

First, I purchased some simple DIY jewelry pieces and used Mod Podge to add photos of myself and my husband when we were young. These were glued to some snowflake ornaments. Quick and easy. We are at the top of the tree.

 

For the rest of the family, I purchased several 2 1/2 inch wooden discs and drilled small holes at the top and painted them gold. I printed out photos of siblings, parents and grandparents for both my husband’s side of the family and my own side. These were decoupaged onto the discs. After allowing them to dry thoroughly, I added a thin layer of Sparkle Mod Podge to give them a little “snowy” feel.

I purchased inexpensive bangle type bracelets for the outer circle. The wooden circles are attached to the bracelets with fishing line and then additional fishing line was used to create the hanger. Thin red ribbon is tied to add a little color.

tree

A few snowflake ornaments, birds, miniature red balls and ribbon are added to the rest of the tree. I love having this reminder of family front and center during the holidays!

We are currently planning a family reunion for next summer and I’m trying to decide if there would be a way to modify this using materials that are on clearance after Christmas. Can’t say I’d want to purchase that many bracelets and I think it may need to be a little simpler, but I think something with the snowflake ornaments might be doable. Something to be thinking about!

Russell County Resources – 1870 Census

Quick Links (details below)

1870 Population Schedule: FamilySearch (Images 277-424) – Ancestry

1870 Mortality Schedule (1 page): FamilySearchAncestry

The 1870 Census was the first census to provide detailed information on the black population, only years after the culmination of the Civil War when slaves were granted freedom.

What’s included:

  • Dwelling-houses, numbered in the order of visitation
  • Families, numbered in the order of visitation
  • The name of each person whose place of abode on 1st day of June, 1870, was in this family
  • Age at last birthday. If under 1 year give months as fractions, thus, 3/12
  • Sex – Males, (M.); Females, (F.)
  • Color – White (W.), Black (B.), Mulatto (M.), Chinese (C.), Indian (I.)
  • Profession, Occupation, or Trade of each person, male or female
  • Value of Real Estate
  • Value of Personal Estate
  • Place of Birth, naming State or Territory of U.S., or the Country, if of foreign birth
  • Father of foreign birth
  • Mother of foreign birth
  • If born within the year, state month (Jan., Feb, &c.)
  • Attended school within the year
  • Cannot read
  • Cannot write
  • Whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, or idiotic
  • Male Citizens of U.S. of 21 years of age and upwards
  • Male Citizens of U.S. of 21 years of age and upwards, whose right to vote is denied or abridged on other ground thus rebellion or other crime

My Notes

  • Stamped page numbers on every other page – would have been on the right hand page of a 2 page spread
  • I’ve also included the handwritten page numbers because in the days before finding these images on the internet, I would write in my notes “ED 103, sheet 4” to help me find it again on the microfilm reel if I ever needed to. I’m willing to bet that some of you have notes like that as well. (There are no ED numbers in this census)
  • I thought it was interesting to note how long it took the enumerator to finish a district – in many cases around 30 days. Your ancestor may very well have moved during those 30 days meaning they don’t appear or may appear twice.

Where to find it: (ready for this section)

  • FamilySearch
    • There are 2 ways to look at these images. You can just look at the images as if you were scrolling through the microfilm or you can view them as a break down of Russell County by Enumeration District. If you are looking at the break down images, you need to know which ED to look at in order to access the pages. Because I found the 2nd way to be so confusing, I thought about leaving that way out. But perhaps there’s some reason that I’m not thinking of as to why you’d want them broken down that way.
      • I’m editing this post to move those “confusing” links to the very bottom of the post. Look for them there, if you are interested.
    • FamilySearch does include a search page in case you don’t know which Enumeration District your ancestor was in. This is a link to search the film which includes Rockcastle, Rowan, Russell and Scott Counties. Use the column on the left side of the page to enter your Ancestor’s name. Link
    • If you click on the “Image Index” tab at the bottom of the screen, you can see a transcription for each name on the page. This can come in especially handy when the ink was light!
  • Ancestry – darn, not free…BUT, I’m including it because it makes it easier to attach a file to  your tree, if you have one. Also, compared to the other websites, I love being able to use the “filmstrip” along the bottom of the screen to go page by page or to jump ahead several pages. There is also a search page. Link
    • At the bottom of the screen, next to where it is showing you the page that you’re on, there is an icon of 2 people with 3 lines next to their heads. Click on this to see Ancestry’s transcription of the names on the page.

Links:

  • Search page
    • FamilySearch – Link
    • Ancestry – Link
  • Precinct #1 – Post Office: Jamestown
    • June 17 – July 19, D Gather Shepherd
    • 56 pages – Stamped 136-163 (Page 1-56)
    • The first 7 names are a continuation of the last family in Precinct #5, then Family #1 begins.
    • FS Link – Image 277-332
    • Ancestry Link
  • City of Jamestown Precinct No 1
    • August 29, D Gather Shepherd
    • 4 pages – Stamped 164-165 (Page 1-4)
    • FS Link – Image 333-336
    • Ancestry Link
  • Precinct #2 – Post Office: Creelsboro
    • July 20-30, D Gather Shepherd
    • 20 pages – Stamped 166-175 (Page 1-20)
    • FS Link – Image 337-356
    • Ancestry Link – Ancestry includes this section with Precinct #1 as well as a separate section.
  • Precinct #3 – Post Office: Rowena
    • August 1-11, D Gather Shepherd
    • 20 pages – Stamped 176-185 (Page 1-20)
    • FS Link – Image 357-376
    • Ancestry LinkAncestry has page 1 in a section of its own. Link
  • Precinct #4 Wolf Creek – Post Office: Hammons Store
    • August 12-27, D Gather Shepherd
    • 27 pages – Stamped 186-199 (Page 1-27) (1 blank page afterward)
    • FS Link – Image 377-403
    • Ancestry Link – Ancestry has page 1 in a section of its own. Link
  • Precinct #5 – Post Office: Jamestown
    • June 6-16, D Gathers Shepherd
    • 20 pages – Stamped 200-209 (Page 1-20)
    • FS Link – Image 405-424
    • Ancestry Link

1870 Census Mortality Schedule

What’s included:

  • Number of the family as given in the 2d column of Schedule 1
    • This is an item often overlooked! You can see which family in the regular census reported the death of the specific person.
  • Name of every person who died during the year ending June 1, 1870, whose place of abode at the time of death was in this family.
  • Age at last birthday. If under 1 year, give months in fractions, thus – 3/12.
  • Sex – Males (M.) Females (F.)
  • Color – White (W.), Black (B.), Mulatto (M.), Chinese (C.), Indian (I.)
  • Married (M.) or Widowed (W.)
  • Place of birth of this person, naming the State or Territory of the U.S., or the country, if of foreign birth.
  • Father of foreign birth.
  • Mother of foreign birth.
  • The Month in which the person died.
  • Profession, Occupation, or Trade.
  • Disease or Cause of Death.

Additional FamilySearch Links

(Not sure why FamilySearch has them organized in 2 ways. The images are identical to those listed above.)

  • Precinct #1 – Post Office: Jamestown
  • City of Jamestown Precinct No 1
  • Precinct #2 – Post Office: Creelsboro
  • Precinct #3 – Post Office: Rowena
  • Precinct #4 Wolf Creek – Post Office: Hammons Store
  • Precinct #5 – Post Office: Jamestown

Russell County Resources – 1880 Census

Looking for free access to census records? It’s my goal to continue adding to the Russell County Resources tab at the top of the screen and this post will add links and information to make sure you are collecting every hint and clue that you can from the 1880 census.

Quick Links (details below)

1880 Population Schedule: FamilySearch (Images 147-304) – Ancestry

1880 Mortality Schedule: FamilySearchAncestry

1880 Non-Population Schedules: I have yet to find any online. I will update this page if I find any.

Population Schedule: What’s included:

  • Number of dwelling home, in order of visitation by the enumerator
  • Number of family, in order of visitation by the enumerator
  • Name of each Person whose place of abode, on 1st day of June, 1880, was in this family
  • Color – White, W.; Black, B.; Mulatto, Mu.; Chinese, C.; Indian, I.
  • Sex – Male, M.; Female, F.
  • Age at last birthday prior to June 1, 1880. If under 1 year, give months in fractions, thus: 3/12
  • If born within the Census year, give the month
  • Relationship of each person to the head of this family – whether wife, son, daughter, servant, boarder, or other
  • Single/Married/Widowed/Divorced
  • Married within the census year
  • Profession, occupation, or trade of each person, male or female
  • Number of months the person had been unemployed within the Census year
  • If the person [on the day of the Enumerator’s visit] sick or temporarily disabled, so as to be unable to attend to ordinary business or duties? If so, what is the sickness or disability?
  • Blind/Deaf and Dumb/Idiotic/Insane/Maimed, Crippled, Bedridden, or otherwise disabled
  • Attended school within the Census year/Cannot read/Cannot write
  • Place of Birth of this person, naming State or Territory of United States, or the Country, if of foreign birth
  • Place of Birth of the Father of this person, naming State or Territory of United States, or the Country, if of foreign birth
  • Place of Birth of the Mother of this person, naming State or Territory of United States, or the Country, if of foreign birth

My Notes

  • Pages are labeled with A, B, C, or D with a stamped page number on every other page. Ex: 471A, 471B, 472C, 472D
  • I’ve also included the handwritten page numbers because in the days before finding these images on the internet, I would write in my notes “ED 103, sheet 4” to help me find it again on the microfilm reel if I ever needed to. I’m willing to bet that some of you have notes like that as well.
  • I thought it was interesting to note how long it took the enumerator to finish a district – in many cases around 30 days. Your ancestor may very well have moved during those 30 days meaning they don’t appear or may appear twice.
  • It appears that a person other than the enumerator has written notes on some of the pages. In that case, I have “Handwritten note”. Notes written by the enumerator (usually about the location) is included after the name of the district.
  • Instructions at the top of each sheet
    • Note A – The Census Year begins June 1, 1879, and ends May 31, 1880.
    • Note B – All persons will be included in the Enumeration who were living on the 1st day of June, 1880. No others will. Children BORN SINCE June 1, 1880, will be OMITTED. Members of Families who have DIED SINCE June 1, 1880, will be INCLUDED.
    • Note C – Questions Nos. 13, 14 (each abt occupation), 22 and 23 (cannot read/write) are not to be asked in respect to persons under 10 years of age.

Where to find it:

  • Internet Archive – Yay! It’s free! Plus, you can download a PDF or ePub file! Link
    • Note that the downloaded file contains more than Russell County and it takes a while to download.
    • After downloading, if I would try to jump to a certain page, the program would momentarily show “not responding” and I’m assuming that’s due to the file size. (About 390 MB)
    • You will see page or image numbers at the bottom of the screen. Russell County begins with image 144
    • This copy is not as easy to read as FamilySearch version. It is slightly fuzzy.
  • FamilySearch – Yay! It’s free!
    • This version looks cleaner than the Internet Archive version.
    • There are 2 ways to look at these images. You can just look at the images as if you were scrolling through the microfilm or you can view them as a break down of Russell County by Enumeration District. If you are looking at the break down images, you need to know which ED to look at in order to access the pages. Because I found the 2nd way to be so confusing, I thought about leaving that way out. But perhaps there’s some reason that I’m not thinking of as to why you’d want them broken down that way.
      • I’m editing this post to move those “confusing” links to the very bottom of the post. Look for them there, if you are interested.
    • FamilySearch does include a search page in case you don’t know which Enumeration District your ancestor was in. Link
    • If you click on the “Image Index” tab at the bottom of the screen, you can see a transcription for each name on the page. This can come in especially handy when the ink was light!
  • Ancestry – darn, not free…BUT, I’m including it because it makes it easier to attach a file to  your tree, if you have one. Also, compared to the other websites, I love being able to use the “filmstrip” along the bottom of the screen to go page by page or to jump ahead several pages. There is also a search page. Link
    • At the bottom of the screen, next to where it is showing you the page that you’re on, there is an icon of 2 people with 3 lines next to their heads. Click on this to see Ancestry’s transcription of the names on the page.

Links:

  • Search page
    • FamilySearch – Link
    • Ancestry – Link
  • Jamestown Pct. #1 – ED 98
    • June 1-24, George W. Williams
    • 29 pages – 471A-485D (Page 1-29)
    • Link – Image 147-176
    • Ancestry Link
  • Creelsboro Pct #2 – ED 99
    • The first page is the Town of Creelsboro. Remaining pages are not labeled that way.
    • June 1-22, B. Holt
    • 29 pages – 486A -500A (Page 1-29)
    • Link – Image 177-205
    • Ancestry Link – After the first 2 pages, there is a title page to separate it from the next section.
  • Rowena – ED 100
    • June 1-19, JM Smith
    • 19 pages – 501A-510C (Page 1-19)
    • Handwritten note – “Rowena Pct No 3 all through”
    • Link – Image 207-225
    • Ancestry Link
  • Rice Wilsons – ED 101
    • June 1-2, John F Popplewell
    • 1 page – 511A (Page 1)
    • Handwritten note – “Mag. Dist. No 4 all through”. I don’t know why FamilySearch would separate this page from the rest. There is a family at the bottom of the sheet that is continued on the next page. It is also separated on Ancestry.
    • Link – Image 227
    • Ancestry Link
  • Magisterial District 4 – ED 101
    • June 3-28, John F Popplewell
    • 21 pages – 511B-521A (Page 2-22)
    • Link – Image 228 -247
    • Ancestry Link
  • Precinct 5 Lucas Mill “The Webb or fifth voting precinct”– ED 102
    • June 1-19, William Grime
    • 20 pages – 522A-531D (Page 1-20)
    • Link – Image 249-268
    • Ancestry Link
  • Precinct 1 Jamestown – ED 103
    • June 1-26, H.H. Nelson
    • 36 pages – 532A-549D (Page 1-36)
    • Handwritten note: “This whole schedule includes part of Precinct No. 1”
    • Link – Image 269-304
    • Ancestry Link

1880 Census Mortality Schedule

What’s included:

  • Number of the family as given in column number 2 – Schedule 1
    • This is an item often overlooked! You can see which family in the regular census reported the death of the specific person.
  • Name of the person deceased
  • Age at last birthday. If under 1 year, give months in fractions, thus – 3/12. If under 1 month, give days in fractions, thus – 3/30
  • Sex
  • Color
  • Single/Married/Widowed or Divorced
  • Place of birth of this person, naming the State or Territory of the U.S., or the country, if of foreign birth.
  • Where was the Father of this person born? (As in Column 9.)
  • Where was the Mother of this person born? (As in Column 9.)
  • Profession, Occupation or Trade. (Not to be asked in respect to persons under 10 years of age.)
  • The month in which the person died.
  • Disease or cause of death.
  • How long a resident of the county? If less than 1 year, state months in fractions, thus – 3/12.
  • If the disease was not contracted at place of death, state the place.
  • Name of attending Physician
    • FamilySearch Link – Images 246-252
      • There is a back side to each of these pages in which physicians were supposed to confirm the cause of death for the individuals on the front side. Part of the instructions state, “The enumerator should endeavor to see in person every physician residing in or near his enumeration district, who is named in this Schedule as the physician attending at death, and courteously invite him to inspect the entries in regard to the cause of death in his cases, and to verify or restate them as the facts may demand.” Russell County only has physician confirmations on 1 sheet (image 251) but don’t assume that is the last page of the mortality schedule. The back sides are not included on the Ancestry pages.
    • Ancestry Link
      • 6 pages – each a different Enumeration District (98 – 103)
    • Note – the last page for Russell County contains entries from “P.R” instead of a family number. “P.R.” stands for Physician’s Returns.

Enumeration District Map information

  • (I would love to have more information on these locations. If anyone knows of better resources, please leave me a comment!)
  • This information is copied from Ancestry, but want to know where they got it from? Check it out.
    • ED 98 – Beginning with the old Jamestown and Columbia road from the Adair County line to Jamestown thence to the Rowena Lilly Creek at Cooks Mill down the Creek to the Cumberland river up the river to the Wayne County line, thence with the Wayne County line to the division line between the Voting Precinct Nos 1 and 3 thence with the line of Voting Precinct No 1 to the Adair County line, thence with said line to beginning.
    • ED 99 – The Cralbaro Voting Precinct Boundary lines well defined.
    • ED 100 – The Rowena Voting Precinct Boundary lines well defined.
    • ED 101 – The Wolfe Creek Voting Precinct Boundary lines well defined.
    • ED 102 – The Webb or 5th Voting Precinct Boundary lines well defined.
    • ED 103 – Beginning in the Adair County line at the crossing of the Jamestown and Columbia road and with the road to Jamestown with the line of Precinct No 1, by Cooks Mill and the Rowena Lilly Creek to Cumberland river, thence up to the division line between Voting Precincts no 1 and 4, thence with the line of Voting Precicnt No 1, to the Adair County line, and with said line to the beginning.

Additional FamilySearch Links

(Confusing to me why you’d want to break them down the way FS did.)

  • Jamestown Pct. #1 – ED 98
    • June 1-24, George W. Williams
    • 29 pages – 471A-485C (Page 1-29)
    • Link
  • Creelsboro (town of) – ED 99
    • June 1-2, B. Holt
    • 2 pages – 486A-B (Page 1-2)
    • Link – Page 2 is the same as page 1 below
  • Creelsboro Pct #2 – ED 99
    • June 2-22, B. Holt
    • 28 pages – 486B -500A (Page 2-29)
    • Link – See “Creelsboro (town of)” for page 1
  • Rowena – ED 100
    • June 1-19, JM Smith
    • 19 pages – 501A-510C (Page 1-19)
    • Handwritten note – “Rowena Pct No 3 all through”
    • Link
  • Rice Wilsons – ED 101
    • June 1-2, John F Popplewell
    • 1 page – 511A (Page 1)
    • Handwritten note – “Mag. Dist. No 4 all through”. I don’t know why FamilySearch would separate this page from the rest. There is a family at the bottom of the sheet that is continued on the next page.
    • Link
  • Magisterial District 4 – ED 101
    • June 3-28, John F Popplewell
    • 21 pages – 511B-521A (Page 2-22)
    • Link
  • Precinct 5 Lucas Mill “The Webb or fifth voting precinct”– ED 102
    • June 1-19, William Grime
    • 19 pages – 522A-531C – (Page 1-20)
    • Link – See “Jamestown – The Webb….” For page 2, sheet 522B
  • Jamestown “The Webb or fifth voting precinct” – ED 102
    • June 2 – William Grime
    • 1 page – 522B
    • Link – This is page 2 of the “Precinct 5 Lucas Mill” sheets
  • Precinct 1 Jamestown – ED 103
    • June 1-26, H.H. Nelson
    • 35 pages – 532A-549D
    • Handwritten note: “This whole schedule includes part of Precinct No. 1”
    • Link – (549C missing) (Page 1-36 page 35 missing) – See Jamestown link below
  • Jamestown – ED 103
    • June 26 – H.H. Nelson
    • 1 page – 549C (Page 35)
    • Link

Plan for Success!

Book_form

I do the majority of my genealogy research at online sites. I am so happy with the amount of information that is now available online, especially through FamilySearch. But sometimes, the information that I’m looking for hasn’t been digitally recorded and I’m lucky that when I look at what’s available for a certain location on FamilySearch, they not only list microfilms, but also books.

FamilySearch

Barren County, Kentucky example: 1 Film and 1 Book

If I see a book that looks valuable, I copy the name of the book and then look to see if my local library has it – and it usually does!

Because I don’t make it to the library as often as I’d like, I keep a list of books I want to make sure to look at when I do get a chance to go. The more planning I do ahead of time, but better success I have when I DO get to the library. I am able to prioritize what I want to look at and really think through exactly what I’m hoping to find in each book. This is the kind of thing I can do when I have a short period of time to PLAN rather than time to research. And I’m taking care of creating citations in the planning stage so that I’m ready to copy and paste a citation directly into my document when my brain is more engaged in thinking through what new information means to my research – when I’m more tempted to say “I’ll take care of that later”.

And how do you think I keep track of all this information? Excel, of course! I have created blank forms for the information.

Book_form

I use my time at home to gather as much information as possible about the book as I can. I collect the full name of the book, author, publisher and the call number. Here’s where I cheat just a little. When looking at the book information on FamilySearch, I use the link to go to WorldCat and look up the book.

WorldCat_link

WorldCat link on every FamilySearch item

I then use the citation creator to go ahead and create a Chicago style citation and I copy and paste that into my form.

Citation

Then, if I add new information to my files as a result of this source, I have the citation ready, I just add the page number at the end of the citation. I doubt that my citation format is the “proper” format, but it works for me and it’s quick. I find that if I try to create my own citation, even from a template, it takes time and I tend to put it off.

I try to fill in as much information as possible before I get to the library, but I also print several of these to take along for the books that I find after I get there. For these “unplanned” books, I delete the text at the top of the form so everything is blank before printing. Here’s another cheat that I use a lot for these unplanned book – instead of writing everything down, I take a picture of the information on my phone and then I write on the sheet that I took a photo and then I add in the information when I get home. I can go back into my library website and use the call number to copy the complete title, find the publisher information, etc.

 

Book info

Often, I have my laptop with me and I’ll just go ahead and fill out the form while I’m there, but if I’m on a roll or feel pressed for time, I use the phone shortcut. Then I use the form to keep notes of what I found or didn’t find.

As soon as I find a book that I want to view when I get to the library, I fill in the form and I use the notes section to remind myself of anything specific I want to look for. When I’m actually looking at the book, I can add information about what the book covers or the condition of the book. Sometimes the layout is poor or it’s hard to read because it’s a copy of a copy. Sometimes there are 2 different book with identical information so I can add a note to save time from looking through both books. Sometimes a book gives me hints on other places to look and I’ll write that in the notes. But I always try to include what I searched for and if I found it or not. If I found something, I add the page I found it on. Anything I might need for my citation later or anything that will remind me if I need to come back to the book later is also included.Filled_form

 

I’ve also included boxes at the top to let me know if the book has an index or not. Did I search the entire thing or did I skim it? Did I just look for a certain person? Did I look for every “Smith” in the book?

I have a similar form for microfilms. I use these forms whether I am at home or at the library. The blank for location is for the name of the library or website where the film was found. The WorldCat hint also works for microfilm citations.

Film_form

Whether I’m scanning at a microfilm machine or downloading from the internet, I have place at the bottom for me to tell when the scans are located. The blue flashdrive? Dropbox? Transferred to external drive? In the “good old days”, I had several flashdrives in my backpack when I’d go to the library and I’d have to make a note about which flashdrive I had used. Things are easier now because so much is online, but I still like to keep track because sometimes, I don’t get back to the files right away.

The Excel file has 2 forms per sheet. But I also use the entire Excel Book to keep track of everything I find – kind of like a research log. To do that,  I copy and paste the forms so that I have all of the Books or Films for a particular county together in one tab. (These forms could also be easily edited to keep track of websites.) If you copy these to a new sheet, be sure to adjust the margin settings including checking the boxes to Center on page.

Margins

For these, I don’t worry about being able to print them out, so I have blank columns between the forms to make them easier to read. The forms are the same size, so I can include books and films in the same tab. Do not include the blank columns between the sheets if you intend to print them.

Multiple_forms

In this instance, my tab would be labeled “Barren County” and whenever I want to do research, I can see exactly what I’ve looked at and what I want to look at next. If my notes are good enough, I can tell exactly which book would be good to go back to if I find another person to research from the same area. I would have a different tab to keep track of resources in other counties.

You can find these forms in the Downloads tab at the top of the screen.

Happy Hunting!

Russell County Resources – Maps

I love old maps. I like knowing that I can pinpoint an exact location for my ancestors at a specific time. But maps for Russell County can be frustrating because of the changes that took place after the Wolf Creek Dam turned the Cumberland River into Lake Cumberland in Russell and Wayne County. It is difficult to find a detailed map of Russell County before the dam was built.

Wolf Creek Dam was built for flood control but also generates hydroelectricity. Construction was started in 1941, but WWII contributed to a delay, so the dam was not completed until 1951.

As a result of the dam, many towns, cemeteries and farms now lie beneath the lake. To see how Russell County looked before the dam, you need to find a map from before 1951. It is not difficult to find a state map of Kentucky before this time, but finding a detailed map of Russell County is difficult.

Several of my ancestors did own land that is now beneath the lake. About a year ago, my husband and I took a vacation to Lake Cumberland and while on a rented houseboat, I fell in love with a map of the Lake that they had on the wall. It not only had the entire Lake and the land on each side, but if you looked closely at the map of the Lake itself, you could see light lines showing the location of the original river and the creeks that no longer exist. I was able to use that information to draw a map of exactly where my ancestor’s land used to be. I loved the map so much that my husband got me a copy for Christmas (2 sided, laminated, 25 x 38) to keep on the wall of my office.

Lake_Cumberland_Map

You can order your own copy here. But let’s look at some historic maps. I tried not to include maps with identical looks, but maps with a different perspective or that were a little difficult to find.

Note: You can always right click to save the images, but those will be thumbnails that I took for the blog. To get the full sized image, click on the links in blue.

The First Map!

Kentucky became a state in 1792 and while Russell County hadn’t yet been formed, you can still see the area with the River and creeks labeled. This map was created in 1793 and can be found on the Library of Congress website.

1793_State_map_portion

Click here.

Military District in Kentucky

Do you have ancestors who found in the Revolutionary War? Did you know that Russell County was part of the Military district which was reserved for Revolutionary War Bounty Land Warrants issued by Virginia?

Military_district

Pioneer Roads

Wondering how your ancestor might have gotten to Kentucky? Here’s a map of the pioneer roads used in this area.

Pioneer_Roads

Click here.

Plat maps and surveys

1819 – Plat map for Creelsboro/Creelsborough surveyed the 22nd and 23rd of April 1819, but included in the Russell County Court orders in 1826. Click here.

1826 – Want to see the original plat map for Jamestown? Click here. See the next page in the Court Orders book for an explanation of the map.

1847 – Plat map of Lairsville surveyed for William D Lair on the north bank of the Cumberland River above the mouth of Rock Run. Click here. Surveyed June 8, 1847, but included in the Court Orders v.1. Haven’t ever seen Lairsville on a map? Check out the 1891 Railroad Map below.

1850 – Survey of the boundary line between the meeting points of Russell, Casey and Pulaski Counties (see the previous page for an explanation of points A – K). Click here.

County Border Changes

Russell County was formed in 1826 from portions of Adair, Cumberland and Wayne Counties. Russell County gained another small portion from Pulaski County in early 1840, but there are an awful lot of maps that don’t show this boundary change, so be aware that if your ancestors lived in this new portion, you may want to check out some maps for Pulaski County. See the boundaries change over time at the Newberry Library’s Atlas of Historical Boundary Changes.

1839_county_border

16 Dec, 1939

1840_county_border

1 March, 1840

1839

Map of Kentucky & Tennessee exhibiting the post offices, post roads, canals, rail roads, &c. found on the Library of Congress website. Not a lot to see in Russell County, but I think it’s interesting to look at the roads and then see what the map legend says. A “sulkey” by the way is a light two-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle for one person, used chiefly in harness racing. Yes, I had to Google that. I’m guessing there wasn’t a lot of harness racing going on here in 1839, but it gives an idea about the size of the road.

sulkey

Source

1839_RR_map_portion

1839_legend

Click here.

1863

Lloyd’s official map of the state of Kentucky compiled from actual surveys and official documents, showing every rail road & rail road station with the distances between each station. Also the counties and county seats, cities, towns, villages, post offices, wagon roads, canals, forts fortifications &c. (Whew! That’s a mouthful of a title!) I like how this map shows the “mountainous” areas. I also like that it labels “Long Bottom” and “Greens Bott’m”. I don’t see those labeled on maps very often.

1863_RR_map_portion

Found on the Library of Congress site. Click here.

1865

Military map of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee. If you read the description details on the Library of Congress website, it says that there is a “Handwritten note on the verso reads “Full of errors-worthless so far as the 5 northern counties are concerned. F. Walley Perkins AC&GS.” Not sure if that refers to counties in Kentucky or in Tennessee.

Military_map

Click here.

As far as the Russell County area goes, the red road from Monticello to Jamestown indicates that it is an “Improved Turnpike & Stage Road”. Notice how close Jamestown is to Mill Springs. There was a Civil War battle here on Jan. 19, 1862. Perhaps  your ancestor participated? Read about the Battle of Mill Springs here. See a map of the battle plan here. There was also a battle at Horse Shoe Bottom – but I’d better save something for my Russell County Military Resources post yet to come…

1891

Preliminary map of Kentucky 1891. Prepared for the Kentucky railroad commissioners by the Kentucky Geological Survey found on the Library of Congress website. No railroads shown going through Russell County, but this map has the various creeks in Russell County well marked. This is a state map, but the detail is awesome even when zoomed in!

1891_RR_map_portion

Click here.

1900

I have a map that I copied from somewhere when I first started doing genealogy research yeeeeaaaaarrrrrsss ago. Being a newbie, I neglected to write down where it came from. But it is very similar to the 1900 ED map (scroll down to see the ED maps), I’m going to guess that the date is also around 1900. I have kept this map on the bulletin board in my office and I refer to it all the time. I like it’s simplicity. To save this map to your computer, right click on the image and select “Save image as…” from the pop-up menu.

Update: I found the map on the FamilySearch site along with maps just like this for every county in Kentucky. The title page for this section of the film says “Kentucky Post Offices 1813 Clift” but I know that can’t apply to these maps because Russell County wasn’t created until 1826. But the maps are great anyway! Click here.

1900 printed map

1911

Here is map of Russell County published in 1911. I find this map interesting because the shape of the county still shows the pre-1840 boundary, but it is very helpful for easily viewing the names of many of the towns in the county.

KY-Russell-County-Kentucky-1911-Rand-McNally-map-Jamestown-Russell-Springs-Esto

Click here.

1924Invert

Click on the link and be sure to use the “Invert” button under tools so that it doesn’t look like an X-ray. Many towns on here I don’t see on other maps!

1924_Russell_County

Click here. (There are 4 images for this map, but really don’t need them all.)

1929

There is a state map from 1929 which is easy to zoom in on. Towns in Russell County include Decatur, Font Hill, Brady, Russell Springs, Eller, Sunshine, Jabez, Jamestown, Denmark, Horseshoe Bottom, Rowena, Olga and Creelsboro. It’s also nice to see some of the towns in surrounding counties that are right on the border.

1929_Russell_County_portion

Download your own PDF here.

1937

There is one map for Russell County from 1937. It is very detailed and includes lots of icons showing every farm, house, hotel, school, church and cemetery – which is wonderful, BUT a bit difficult to read.

1937_Russell_County

Click here to download this map in PDF format.

The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has a series of archived County Road maps available on their website which you can access by clicking here. You can click through every county to see which years are available for a map.

1939

Another state map from 1939 has fewer cities, but more accurate county boundary lines. The names of the creeks south of the Cumberland River are also included. Towns include Font Hill, Russell Springs, Jamestown, Freedom, Creelsboro and Rowena.

1939_Russell_County_portion

Download a PDF here.

Enumeration maps

I have searched for these maps forever! Finally had some success! Want to see which part of the county was Precinct #3 in the census records? These are the maps for you!

1900 – I don’t see any district lines here, but it’s included in the series. I do see some numbers in circles. Some towns I don’t recall seeing on other maps other than the Quadrangle maps – Royalton, Wesley, Stokes, Palace. This map is very similar to the unsourced map I included above for 1900.

1900_ED

 

1910 – Have to chuckle that at the bottom of this map it say “Approximately correct”.

1910_ED

1920 – This looks like the 1911 map which makes me wonder if there are people enumerated in this census that were actually from Casey County?

1920_ED

1930 – This map is like a vision test. Imagine you have a dirty paper and you use an eraser to write your labels. Gotta look closely! The number “3” in the very middle of the map is the type of thing you are looking for. If you have a hard time seeing it, play around with the brightness levels (Adjust levels) in the tools in the upper right corner.

1924_Russell_County

1940 – the map is larger than one sheet, so see images 183-186. (Although a little irritating because I think they could have centered the image and got just about the whole thing if you don’t care about the margins!) And I gotta say, this map is pretty darn good for seeing all the towns even if you don’t pay any attention to the district boundary lines!

1940_ED

1950 – This census isn’t available to the public yet, but the enumeration map is! This is the 1937 map listed above, but with the enumeration boundaries added in.

1950_ED

1953/54 Topographical maps

I also enjoy looking at topographical maps. Those are the maps with all of the wavy lines showing how flat or steep the land in the area is. The closer together the lines are, the steeper the land in that area. I am in awe of the hard work that our ancestors put into running farms on such hilly land.

Topographical maps are quite large (48 x 57!) – which means you can see a lot of information, but they are difficult to print. They are available to download for free and you can zoom in quite well to look at a specific area – if you know which area you want to zoom in to! In the past, I have been able to find topographic maps for portions of Russell County, but I was never able to understand how to find the map of the part of Russell County that I specifically was looking for. I have finally had some luck in doing that!

These maps are from 1953/1954 which means they include Lake Cumberland, but none the less, they are wonderful. I have put together an image showing which topo map goes with each section of the county along with links to each map. I’ve also tried to make a list of which towns are shown on each map. Towns with an * are visible on the 1911 map above, but not the topo maps. Towns with a ** are now beneath the Lake. I’m sure I’ve missed some towns, but I think I’ve found most of them! I hope you find these maps helpful to your research!

Map_Key

  1. Dunnville Quadrangle
  2. Montpelier Quadrangle
  3. Russell Springs Quadrangle – Bechorn Ridge, Decatur, Eller, Esto, Fonthill, Horntown, Humble, Jericho, Middletown, Poplar Grove, Russell Springs (Big Boiling Springs, Kimble), Royville, Salem, Webs Cross Roads
  4. Eli Quadrangle – Avis*, Brady, Dallo, Eli, Happy Acre, Hammond Store, Irvins Store, Royalton, Salem, Sunshne*, Whittle
  5. Faubush Quadrangle – Sandy Hollow, Vinnie
  6. Amanadaville Quadrangle
  7. Creelsboro Quadrangle – Bryan, Creelsboro, Denmark, Gum Corners, Helm, Long Bottom, Old Olga, Olga, Owensby, Ribbon
  8. Jamestown Quadrangle – Apple Valley, Clyde, Effie*, Freedom, Helm*, Horseshoe Bottom**, Jamestown, Karlus, Lula**, Lulu (Bugtown), Nelson’s Mill, Owensby, Rose Crossroads, Rowena, Sewellton, Wesley*
  9. Jabez Quadrangle – Bart, Dell*, Jabez, Jay, Ono, Palace*
  10. Mill Springs Quadrangle
  11. Wolf Creek Dam Quadrangle
  12. Cumberland Quadrangle –  Kendall*, Ucum*

1955

If you have an ancestor that you’ve located in the 1900-1940 Russell County census records, then you may have noticed that on many of the pages, in the far left column, the numerator has written the name of the road your ancestor lived on. Not sure where that road is located? Then these are the maps for you.

1955_road_map

I know you probably can’t read everything here, but the text is a list of the rural roads in the county along with a number and a “battleship game” type of code to help you locate it on the map. Get your magnifying glass for this one!

Add this to your collection by clicking here.

Finding that one a little hard to read? Try this version from 1996. Nicely divided into 4 quadrants with the list of roads on a separate page, making it easier to read.

Or this version from 2005. Even easier to read because each quadrant gets a page of it’s own!

Gazatteer

And finally, here’s a link to a Gazatteer on the Kentucky.gov web site. It says it “lists county information for more than 1000 place names identified in early Kentucky patents.”

 

Russell County Resources – 1890 Census

Did you know that the 1890 census was the first to use punchcards and an electrical tabulation system? (Bureau of the Census) I find that fascinating!

It is commonly stated that the 1890 census was lost to a fire in 1896. Actually, In December 1932, in accordance with federal records procedures at the time, the Chief Clerk of the Bureau of Census sent the Librarian of Congress a list of papers no longer necessary for current business and scheduled for destruction. He asked the Librarian to report back to him any documents that should be retained for their historical interest. Item 22 on the list for Bureau of the Census read “Schedules, Population . . . 1890, Original.” The Librarian identified no records as permanent, the list was sent forward, and Congress authorized destruction on February 21, 1933. At least one report states the 1890 census papers were finally destroyed in 1935, and a small scribbled note found in a Census Bureau file states “remaining schedules destroyed by Department of Commerce in 1934 (not approved by the Geographer).” Click here to read the entire story. It is quite interesting!

While Kentucky has no surviving 1890 census records, Russell County is quite lucky to have the Special Enumeration of Union Veterans and Widows! Often confused with the 1890 census, and more often overlooked or misjudged as useless, are nearly seventy-five thousand special 1890 schedules enumerating Union veterans and widows of Union veterans. Nearly all of these schedules for the states of Alabama through Kansas and approximately half of those for Kentucky appear to have been destroyed before transfer of the remaining schedules to the National Archives in 1943.

The Pension Office requested the special enumeration to help Union veterans locate comrades to testify in pension claims and to determine the number of survivors and widows for pension legislation. Source

I have looked for the 1890 Special Census on FamilySearch and have not been able to find it, but way back in 2009, I created an Excel doc with my own transcriptions. I am making that available to anyone through Google Drive who clicks on the link. This is the first time I’ve tried to share a Google Drive document through the blog, so someone send me a note to let me know if it’s working or not.

Lisa’s Excel Transcriptions: Link

Images of the census are available on Ancestry.

1890 state list

Related_list

Even this is difficult to find because the dropdown list for the 1890 census does not include Kentucky since the population schedule itself did not survive.

The “Related data collections” on the right side of the 1890 Census Fragment page does not include the 1890 Special Census.

 

Included_collections

But if you click on “U.S. Federal Census Collection”, then you will see the link for the 1890 Veterans Schedules. Russell

You can use the Search page to see if your ancestor was indexed for this schedule, or you can browse by Township. Notice that what Ancestry has transcribed as “Creekton” is actually “Creelsboro” and “Webbs Road” is actually “Webbs Cross Roads”.

 

What’s included?

The top of the sheet indicates this is a list of “Persons who served in the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps of the United States during the war of the rebellion (who are survivors), and widows of such persons.”

  • House No. and Family No. (Corresponded to the Population Schedule)
  • Names of Surviving Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines, and Widows
  • Rank
  • Company
  • Name of Regiment of Vessel
  • Date of Enlistment
  • Date of Discharge
  • Length of Survice
  • Post Office Address
  • Disability Incurred
  • Remarks

Links

I’m adding a 1911 map of Russell County at the bottom so you can see what part of the county each precinct was in.

  • Creelsboro – 4 pages – Link
    • Post-Office Addresses include
      • Creelsboro, Russell Co.
      • Crocus, Adair Co.
      • Rowena, Russell Co.
      • Denmark, Russell Co.
  • Jamestown – 10 pages (the last page has been crossed out) – Link
    • Post-Office Addresses include
      • Jamestown
      • Kimble (This was the name for Russell Springs between 1888 and 1901)
      • Montpelier (Adair Co)
      • Esto
      • Denmark
      • Horse Shoe Bottom
  • Precinct 3 – 3 pages – Link
    • Post-Office Addresses include
      • Rowena
      • Denmark
      • Horse Shoe Bottom
      • Seventy Six, Clinton Co.
      • Clide, Wayne Co. (should be Clyde)
  • Webbs X Roads – 2 pages – Link
    • Post-Office Addresses include
      • Jamestown
      • Webbs X Roads
      • Kimble
      • Font Hill
      • Irvins Store
      • Dunnville
  • Wolf Creek – 2 pages – Link
    • Post-Office Addresses include
      • Jabez
      • Wolf Creek
  • Wayne County
    • Seeing some Wayne County names in the Russell Co schedule made me wonder if there might be some Russell County names in the Wayne Co schedule and there were. All on the same page. Link
      • Rebecca Stacy widow of James M. Stacy
      • James H. Miller
      • John S. Decker
      • John Lockard
  • Adair County
    • James Withers and Henry Warter – Link
    • Perry J Lovber and Spencer Burton – Link
  • Clinton County
    • Francis? M Bell and Raney McKiney – Link

KY-Russell-County-Kentucky-1911-Rand-McNally-map-Jamestown-Russell-Springs-Esto

 

 

 

Russell County Census Resources

I’ve been working on additional resources for Russell County, but they aren’t coming together as quickly as I would have liked due to “regular life” as well as taking time for my own research getting in the way. I was hoping to add links to census records along with specific notes for each census for Russell County in a more organized way, but I’ve decided that I’ve just got to jump in and get them in as I have time to complete them. My plan was to start with the 1830 census – the first census that would have included Russell County and then work my way forward.

But the more interesting/popular census records start with 1850 when every name in the household was listed so maybe I should start there? Or maybe it would be better to start with the 1880 census when they also included the relationships of everyone listed? I’ve gone back and forth on various plans, but unless I wait until I have all of the census resources finished, then it’s hard to come up with an organization plan.

So instead, I’ve just decided to work on the resources with notes as my own research leads me to research in a specific census. Therefore, I’m beginning with the 1890 census and then as the others are completed, I’ll add them. This irritates my OCD side to no end, but I really want to get the information out there!

As I complete each set of census resources and notes, I’ll be adding them to the Resources Tab at the top of the blog so that they will be easy to find in one place.

I hope you find these useful!

Happy Hunting!

 

Russell County Resources – Court Records

Russell County, Kentucky Court Records:

Family Search: