Russell County Resources – Court Records

Russell County, Kentucky Court Records:

Family Search:

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DNA Circles Tracker

I love the DNA circles on Ancestry, but I think I’ve mentioned before that I wish we could choose to add a person to a circle. There are times when I can see a common ancestor in a tree, but Ancestry hasn’t included that person in the circle. Sometimes, it just needs more time as I feel like the Circles are the slowest feature on the DNA page to fill. Other times, it’s because someone has used a slightly different version of a name. For example, I have Jehu Rumbo, but often, the name was transcribed as John Rumbo and several people have his name that way in their tree. Sometimes, it an ancestor from another country and one user has the “American name” and the other has the “Foreign name”.

But even seeing the list of names in the circles was at times irritating to me. How exactly are we related? By the time I click on each name to see the connection, I’ve forgotten the first person’s “path”. I can include information in the notes, but again, that’s a click for each person and I wanted to be able to see all of the paths for all of the people in one place. So I created an Excel sheet to help me keep track of my Circles. (All names in this sheet are fictional.)

DNA_Circles_short

This is a full sheet instead of a half sheet and I find that I am using the full sheets much more often than the half sheets. I tend to use the half sheets when I haven’t determined a connection yet or if I have a list of people with a common segment on GEDmatch, but still no common ancestor determined.

I put the common ancestor couple in the long box at the top. On the left side, I add my “path”. As I put each person’s path into the sheet, I try to group them by children. Notice that in the example above, the two individuals who’s paths came through the same son – Bill Smith – are next to each other. It’s not uncommon for me to cut a path and paste it to a new location on the sheet.

There is a top section and a bottom section on this sheet. If I have enough people in the circle, then the top and the bottom will have the same common couple in the long lines. But occasionally, I’ll have several people who have a common ancestor who is related to the family in another way, and I want to keep them together, but separate.  Perhaps we know the 2 long boxes are siblings, but no one has yet figured out their parents.

I also like to include GEDmatch numbers, if I know them. If I am collecting the information from Ancestry and their tree is public, or has been shared with me, then I can make the cell with the Ancestry name into a link to the tree. In the example above, the cell that says “Ancestry: Tconn” could become a clickable link to go directly to the tree.

Recently, I created a “theory tree” on Ancestry to help me find some clues for my brick wall ancestor. (I would like to note that this theory tree is private because the information in it is not proven. Your tree must be public if you want to be included in any DNA circles created by Ancestry.) I attached my mother’s dna to THAT tree and have been very happy with the number of ancestor hints I have gotten based on that. I now have 14 people with a dna connection who also have the same people in their tree as in my theory tree. Those trees go back to my mom’s potential 6th great grandfather and some of the matches are 6th cousins twice removed. Because of this, I also needed a template with more generations that in the example above.

DNA_Circles_long

My issue with this sheet will be that I do not yet have the proven link from my known ancestor to the common ancestor, so I am planning to use fill colors in the boxes that are “theory” steps in my path. I’m hoping that by collecting the information of all my matches into one sheet, I will see patterns and probably some collateral lines that I am missing in my tree.

This long template is also included in the download.

If you are looking for my other DNA templates sheets, you can find them in the “Downloads” tab at the top of the blog.

Russell County Resources – Probate

Russell County, Kentucky Probate Records:

Family Search:

Will Records: contains inventories, appraisals, sales, settlements and wills

Administrator Bonds: indexes are alphabetical by administrator. Bonds are chronological.

List of Administrator & Executors – 1876 – 1883 – 10 pages

Executor Bonds:

Appraisals, Inventories and Sales:

Inventories, 1879 – 1901, V. 1contains an index (a different filming of V. 1 above. 1 additional page of A’s in the index)

Estate Settlements:

Guardian Bonds: indexes are by guardian’s name

Guardian Records, 1876 – 1880, V. 14 pages

Ancestry:

Ancestry has the same images as FamilySearch, but it’s nice to be able to attach a record to your tree on Ancestry.

Will Records: contains inventories, appraisals, sales, settlements and wills

Administrator Bonds: indexes are alphabetical by administrator. Bonds are chronological.

List of Administrator & Executors – 1876 – 1883 – 10 pages

Executor Bonds:

Inventory, Appraisement and Sale Bills:

  • V. 1, 1879 – 1901 – not available on Ancestry
  • V. 2, 1901 – 1010 – not available on Ancestry
  • V. 3, 1910 – 1918 – not available on Ancestry
  • V. 4, 1917 – 1928 – not available on Ancestry
  • V. 5, 1928 – 1940contains an index
  • V. 6, 1940 – 1954  – index begins with letter A (FamilySearch version begins with F)
  • V. 7, 1954 – 1975index begins with letter A (FamilySearch version begins with G)

Inventories, 1879 – 1901, V. 1contains an index (a different filming of V. 1 above. 1 additional page of A’s in the index)

Estate Settlements:

Guardian Bonds: indexes are by guardian’s name

Guardian Records, 1876 – 1880, V. 14 pages

DNA Tracker Full Sheet

As I work more with my DNA matches, I keep finding additional information that I’d like to keep track of. I really like the Ancestry DNA circles, but unless information in two trees matches in pretty specific ways, the matches don’t show up in your circle. I wish there was a way to add people to a user created circle to help me keep track of those matches.

So I decided that I needed a way to keep track of “In Common With” matches to make a DNA circle of my own. Because I was always jotting notes in the margins of my DNA planner half-sheet, I decided I needed a full sheet version as well.

Full_SheetThis sheet has the original layout on the left, but on the right side, I’ve included an area to keep track of “In Common With” matches. You’ll notice that on the left side, I have included my actual information. That is the email address that I use when exchanging information with people who are a DNA match for one of my kits. And those are my GEDmatch number, FTDNA number and MyHeritage name. Might as well get those out there for my cousins to find me with! I keep track of which chromosome we have matching segments on in the center column.

Honestly, at this point in my research, I mainly use Ancestry and GEDmatch, so if I need more space for GEDmatch kits, I rename the FTDNA and MyHeritage lines and use them for the additional information, but I wanted to show how it could be used.

All of the information on the right side is fictional. I wanted to show how you can customize your sheet by making some words bold as well as how I indicate a number of shared cMs. When I end up with a cluster of matches on a specific segment of DNA, I take a screenshot of that information and print it on the back of this sheet. (I’m not showing the kit details to protect the privacy of those matches, but I would include that as well.) You’ll see that on the left side of the sheet, the chromosome number 12 is in red to show that I have a screen shot of that information on the back of my page.

Chromosome_12_chart

I still use my half-sheet for people that I share smaller numbers of cMs with or haven’t quite found a connection for or who I don’t have contact information for yet. But I’m finding this full sheet to be helpful for keeping all of my information straight in my mind.

You can find the sheet in the Downloads tab at the top of the blog, or by clicking here. Blank DNA Full Sheet

 

Russell County Resources – Deaths

Russell County, Kentucky Deaths:

Information found:

Death Registers:

  • Name of Deceased
  • Age
  • Sex
  • Condition (married, single, widow)
  • Occupation
  • Residence (County)
  • Place of Birth (County and State)
  • Name of Parents or Owners of Slaves
  • Place of Death
  • Time of Death (They are giving the date)
  • Cause of Death
  • Remarks

Family Search:

  • 1852 – images 241 – 242
  • 1853 – images 245 – 246
  • 1854 – images 248 – 249
  • 1855 – images 251 – 252
  • 1856 – image 254
  • 1857 – image 256
  • 1858 (cover says 1859) – image 258 – 260 (now seeing the names of towns instead of County only)

1875 – only available to view from a Family History Center or FamilySearch affiliate library

1903 – 1904  – only available to view from a Family History Center or FamilySearch affiliate library (assuming it was moved from the viewable files listed above).

1908 – 1910 – only available to view from a Family History Center or FamilySearch affiliate library

Federal Census Mortality Schedules:

  • 1850 – Russell County – 3 pages – this was to include the “name of every person who died during the Year ending 1st June 1850, whose usual Place of Adobe at the Time of his Death was in his Family.”
  • 1860 – Russell County – 2 pages – same instructions (1st June, 1860)
  • 1870 – Russell County – 1 page – same instructions (1st June, 1870)
  • 1880 – Russell County – 6 pages – “Persons who died during the year ending May 31, 1880”
    • Don’t stop when you get to the pages with “Instructions”. There is one additional page after that.
    • Notice the number in the first column. That is the family number that matches the family that gave the information. Look for the corresponding Supervisor District and Enumeration District (found in the upper left corner) in the Regular Census and then find the Family Number in column two.

Ancestry:

Military:

  • U.S. Registers of Deaths of Volunteers, 1861 – 1865. Look to the right for the box labeled “Browse this collection” and select “Kentucky” from the dropdown menu. Although this is for all of Kentucky, names are arranged “Alphabetically” (all the A’s, though not in order, then all of the B’s, ect) so if you are looking for a specific person, it wouldn’t be too difficult to find.
    • Information includes: Surname, Christian name, Rank, Company, Regiment, Date of Death, Place of Death, Cause of Death, Remarks.
    • A-K – 182 pages
    • L-Z – 180 pages

DNA Sheet – Doubly Related

As I have been organizing my DNA matches, I have found a surprising number of people who are related through 2 different lines. For these people, I have created an Excel doc that has an area for each tree.

Doubly_Related

For these situations, I have a page that is intended to be folded in half before adding to my 5.5 x 8.5 planner. If I ever decide that I need a larger book such as a 3 ring binder for DNA information, then I would use all of my sheets “as is”. No folding or cutting in half.

For these sheets, I have included a larger area for notes as well. As I research each line, I can keep notes on communications I’ve had with this DNA cousin as well as notes about documentation that I have found that tie the two lines together.

In addition to the 4 kits that I manage for my Mom and her siblings, I also manage a kit for their first cousin. When cM numbers seem “out of whack” such as when this cousin has a MUCH higher number of cMs than the siblings, I can use the 2nd chart to show that. He may be related through his paternal side (my Mom’s side) as well as through his maternal side – which my Mom and her siblings are not. Even through the 2nd chart will show a relationship that is not part of my direct line, it helps me to understand why the cM numbers seem to be inconsistent.

Click here to download this Blank DNA Doubly Related or find the link in the Downloads tab at the top of the page.

 

Russell County Resources – Deeds

Russell County, Kentucky Deeds:

Family Search:

The left pages list Grantor (seller) to Grantee (buyer) and the right pages list Grantee from Grantor. Because of the tight binding in V. 1, it is sometimes difficult to read the information in the center of 2 pages. In cases where you cannot read a complete page number on the left page, it can be helpful to look for the same entry for the Grantee, which will be on a page on the right side.

These indexes are arranged loosely alphabetically. All the A’s (although not alphabetical within the A’s) then all of the B’s etc. Within each letter, records are listed in order by book. All of the A’s in book A in order, then all of the A’s in book B in order, etc.

I have found instances where the General Index is incorrect. The index with each book, when available, will be the most accurate. Each book’s index lists Grantor to Grantee, but not Grantee from Grantor. If you are looking for a deed where your ancestor is purchasing land, you may have better luck looking in the General Index.

General Index to Deeds V. 1 – 1825 – 1881Books A-M

General Index to Deeds V. 2 – 1880 – 1922 – Books N-Z and 1-7

General Index to Deeds V. 3 – 1920 – 1937 – Books 8-16

General Index to Deeds V. 4 – 1937 – 1948 – Books 17-26

General Index to Deeds V. 5 – 1948 – 1957 – Not yet available online

Deed Book A – 1825 – 1829 – no index

Deed Book B – 1828 – 1835 – no index

Deed Book C – 1835 – 1840 – includes an index

Deed Book D – 1840 – 1847 – includes an index which appears to begin with the letter C. Skip to image 8 and you will find the entire index.

Deed Book E – 1848 – 1853 – includes an index

Deed Book F – 1853 – 1857 – includes an index

Deed Book G – 1856 – 1862 – includes an index

Deed Book H – 1861 – 1866 – includes an index

(There is no Deed Book I)

Deed Book J – 1866 – 1871 – includes an index

Deed Book K – 1869 – 1875 – includes an index

Deed Book L – 1875 – 1878 – includes an index

Deed Book M – 1877 – 1881 – includes an index of both Grantor to Grantee and Grantee from Grantor

Deed Book N – 1881 – 1886includes an index of both Grantor to Grantee and Grantee from Grantor

Deed Book O – 1884 – 1889 – includes an index of both Grantor to Grantee and Grantee from Grantor

Deed Book P – 1889 – 1892 – not currently available online

Deed Book Q – 1892 – 1897 – includes an index of both Grantor to Grantee and Grantee from Grantor

Deed Book R – 1896 – 1900 – includes an index of both Grantor to Grantee and Grantee from Grantor

Deed Book S – 1900 – 1903 – not currently available

This is all of the Deed Books listed as of Sept. 4, 2017. Additional records listed:

Commissioners deeds, 1875 – 1909 – not currently available

Commissioner’s deed books 1-4, 1877 – 1945 – not currently available

Report of commissioners of division of land, 1876 – 1955 – not currently available

Non-residents land register, 1875 – 1899 – not currently available

 

DNA Sheets for Genealogy Planner

I have jumped into the DNA pool with both feet. To say that it has become an obsession would not be an overstatement. And as I learn more about it and begin to interact more with DNA cousins, I have had to develop a system for keeping track of information. If you have Russell County connections and you are on GEDmatch, I would love to have your number to compare with my kits! I will add my kit numbers to the About Me tab.

I love the format that Ancestry uses for showing you how another user is connected to you based on their DNA plus Tree. If a person has a DNA match to you AND they have a tree with a common ancestor in it, they show that person’s path to the ancestor right next to yours. And if you are related through more than one person, they will show you that as well.

Ancestry_example

I want to be able to keep track of these connections as well as be able to track when a person’s DNA results are also on another cite – especially GEDmatch.

I have created several different sheets, but I thought I’d share them one at a time. I keep tweaking them as I use them more, but I’m pretty happy with this first sheet. After I post each sheet, I will update the Downloads tab at the top of the page to include every sheet.Sheet_Example

 

My sheets are designed to go into my Genealogy Planner, so there are 2 sheets per page which are made to be cut in half and hole punched to fit in a 5.5 x 8.5 planner. The layout is landscape and the margins are .25 on the top and bottom, .2 on the left and right.

My first page is like a “Contact” page. I have the person’s name, if known. Many times, I won’t know a person’s real name until we connect through the messaging system on Ancestry or through email if I’m using GEDmatch. You don’t want to keep referring to someone as DrummerBoy once you know their real name! I have the Excel sheet set up so that the name that I type in this area also shows up on the side of the sheet so when I am flipping through my pages, I can find the name faster.Name

 

Chr_list

On the right corner, I have Paternal/Maternal. I simply delete the text that doesn’t apply. I keep these organized in my Planner based on my Maternal and Paternal Grandparents. Below that line, I have 3 lines for the surnames that we match on.

You can also see that in the middle, I have a column to keep track of which chromosome(s) we have in common. You cannot find this information on Ancestry, but any site that has a chromosome browser will allow you to see this.

In the next section, I keep track of user names User_namesfor each of the sites that I use. It’s not uncommon for someone to have their results on more than one site, but they don’t always have the same name. So a test might be “B.C.” on Ancestry, “Aunt Barbara” on FTDNA and her full name on MyHeritage. GEDmatch assigns every kit with a number, but the person uploading the information gets to decide if they will use an alias or a real name.

In an area to the right that’s not meant to be printed, I have a chart to help me keep track of how many shared cMs each of my kits has with a cousin’s kit(s). I then use Jing to take a screen clipping of this information and I paste it into the area titled “cM shared”. On the right side, I have not merged the cells so that if I only have information for 1 person who matches 1 of my kits, I can use the lines to add that information instead of a table. So far, I have always ended up merging those cells and using my table, but I wanted to leave the option in there. I also try to always tell where the numbers are coming from because the different sites do not calculate shared cMs the same way.

Shared_cMs

In the bottom section, I have the Ancestry-like relationship chart and a blank line for me to enter the calculated relationship.

 

Relationship_chart

I prefer rounded corners on my boxes, so these borders are created by adding a shape on top of the cell. You must click in the center of the cell or your text will not appear because Excel will think that you are adding to the shape if you click on its border. If you find this frustrating, you can always delete the shapes and add a border around each cell. Text wrapping is turned on, but you can force a line return by typing Alt + Enter if you want to force the female name onto the 2nd line within the cell.

I have a 2nd sheet within the Excel workbook that includes blank lines for notes that can be printed on the back side of the contact sheet. Sometimes, my notes are nothing more than the date that I tried to contact a person, and I do have a short area for notes on the front for that. But sometimes, if a cousin and I are researching together, I also keep notes to help me remember what I’m keeping my eyes out for.

Notes

I hope you find these forms as helpful as I have! There will be more DNA sheets to come over the next couple of weeks!

Click here to download the Blank DNA Planner Sheet.

 

Russell County Resources – Marriages

 

Russell County, Kentucky Marriages:

Information found:

Marriage Registers:

  • Date of Marriage
  • Groom
    • Name
    • Residence (County)
    • Age
    • Condition (I think this is number of marriage)
    • Place of birth (County)
  • Bride
    • Name
    • Residence (County)
    • Age
    • Condition
    • Place of Birth
    • Remarks

Family Search:

  • 1856 – image 232
  • 1857 – image 234
  • 1858 – image 236
  • 1859 – image 239 plus an additional page at the end of the death register records. Image 261 (This is an easy one to miss so be sure to check it out!)

Ancestry:

Family Search:

Marriage Book 1 – 1826-1854 Index to Brides, Grooms, Ministers, Witnesses and Others

Marriage Records V. 1 – A register of marriages

Marriage Records V. 2 – Marriage Bonds and Certificates 1854 – 1860 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms

Marriage Bonds V. 2 – Marriage Bonds and Certificates 1861 – 1867 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 3 – Marriage Bonds and Certificates 1867 – 1875 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 4 – Marriage Bonds and Applications 1875 – 1878 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 5 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1876 – 1880 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 6 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1880 – 1883 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 7 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1883 – 1886 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 8 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1886 – 1889 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 9 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1889 – 1892 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 10 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1892 – 1895 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 11 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1895 – 1999 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms. Some loose permissions as well.

Marriage Bonds V. 12 – Marriage Bonds, Applications and Certificates 1899 – 1901 – contains an alphabetical index of grooms.